Conferences

What Are Customer Data? New Data for Better Decisions

Overview

MSI’s annual industry-leading symposium will convene analytics leaders, data scientists, and top researchers to investigate issues at the front line of marketing analytics and practice. Drawing on domain expertise in economics, information systems, statistics, computer science, and marketing science, presenters will address the full range of questions, opportunities, and challenges posed by abundant and increasing customer data. These top researchers and scientists will offer the latest approaches and evidence-based findings, and will discuss implications for strategic decision making. Among the topics they will address:

  • Optimizing data for predictive modelling and attribution
  • Moving beyond transactional data
  • Combining multiple data sets for a more complete customer view
  • New approaches in machine learning, AI, data visualization, natural language processing, and predictive analytics
  • Leveraging data to transform the “last mile” in the buying journey
  • Visual analytics
  • New insights on CRM and CLV

Agenda

11/06/2019


Please note that this is a rough agenda for planning purposes only. All times are subject to change.

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Networking Breakfast
9:00 – 9:30 Welcome and Introductions
9:30 – 10:00 Presentation to be Announced
JP Dube, University of Chicago
10:00 – 10:30 The Role of Customer Data in Optimizing User Experience (UX):  Opportunities for Competitive Advantage
Jim Maurer, Data Scientist, Volkswagen of America, Inc.
Today, with relentless increases in informational efficiencies, customers expect high quality at competitive prices. Price and quality are seen as table stakes, and the overall user experience becomes a vital point of differentiation. For competitive advantage in UX design, brands should expand their use of customer data from targeting, prediction, and recommendation to informing an optimal UX. Jim Maurer will discuss how customer data and machine learning methods can be leveraged to engineer enhanced user experiences, and will offer examples in case studies from automotive, consumer products and digital media verticals.
10:30 – 11:00 Break
11:00 – 11:30 Optimizing Messages
Sanjog Misra, University of Chicago
Constructing and implementing messages is fundamental to the task of marketing. New developments in technology and machine learning as well as the emergence of scalable experimentation have facilitated the emergence of algorithmic solutions to what has been traditionally been thought of as a creative exercise. Can algorithms create realistic and relevant marketing messages? Are such messages better from an objective point of view? Can the messages be personalized? In this talk Sanjog Misra will present ongoing research that discusses the answers to these and other related questions.
11:30 – 12:00 p.m. A Dynamic Model of Customer Efficiency
Gary Class, Senior Vice President, Wells Fargo & Company
Gary Class will discuss how Wells Fargo has enabled a deep understanding of the key drivers of customer engagement through fine-grained observation and interpretation of routine banking activity over time. Analyzing customers’ detailed interactions with the bank’s multiple service channels has resulted in a robust behavioral segmentation scheme, “Customer Efficiency,” which explicitly identifies the customer’s role in the service delivery process. By understanding the task the customer seeks to accomplish as well as the preferred channel, the bank can identify the marketing strategy to move the client to a higher-order “Customer Efficiency” segment.
12:00 – 12:30 Presentation to be Announced
Justine Hastings, Brown University
12:30 – 2:00 Lunch
2:00 – 2:30 Consumer Friendly Advertising
Phillip Leslie, Chief Digital Economist & Vice President, Amazon
In the last 5 years Amazon has developed a significant advertising business, consisting of both brand and performance advertising products that are available for advertisers that sell products at Amazon as well as elsewhere. These ad products are designed to create value for advertisers, as well as enhancing the shopping experience of Amazon’s customers. Phil Leslie will discuss how Amazon uses numerous inputs to accomplish this, including the signals from advertisers (campaign inputs) as well as contextual and behavioral signals from customers. These signals and advanced modeling techniques have allowed Amazon to develop consumer friendly advertising that delivers performance to its advertisers.
2:30 – 3:00 From Cookies to Customers
Sarah Moshary, University of Chicago
Many companies collect data on visitors to their website, tracking detailed behavior about cookies: time on the site, pages viewed, and traffic source, among others. These data are ideal for offering insight about session-level outcomes, but firms are often more interested in optimizing for a longer horizon for users. A single user might touch a website on multiple browsers, computers, or mobile devices, generating multiple cookies. This fragmentation poses a problem for simple A/B tests run at the cookie-level. How can firms map cookies back to users? How can we design experiments to avoid the problems of fragmentation? In this talk, Sarah Moshary will discuss recent advances in the marketing literature that seek to address these problems.
3:00 – 3:30 Break
3:30 – 4:00 Presentation to be Announced
David Reiley, Principal Scientist, Pandora
4:00 – 4:30 Experimentation and Causality in Modern Digital Advertising
Harikesh Nair, Stanford University ​​​​​
Worldwide digital ad spending in 2018 is around $300B, accounting for about 50% of total media advertising. A significant driver of this growth is the better measurability of digital ads compared to traditional formats. Digital ads leverage sophisticated tracking to understand outcomes and exposure, and utilize experimentation to determine causality and attribution. In this talk, Harikesh Nair describes how modern ad-systems do this at scale, using examples from the ad-experimentation platform of JD.com in China. He will describe how experimentation is now delivered “as a service” via self-serve products deployed on platforms; how advertisers and brands can leverage those products to improve their marketing activities; and how modern marketplaces are moving towards continuous experimentation that seamlessly merges experimentation with optimization of marketing instruments.
4:30 – 4:45 Reflections and Closing Remarks
4:45 – 6:15 Networking Reception
11/07/2019
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Networking Breakfast
9:00 – 9:15 Opening Remarks
9:15 – 9:45 Precisely Wrong: The Limits of Targeting
Karin Kricorian, Director, Management Science and Integration, The Walt Disney Company
Despite our decades of effort, marketers’ understanding of consumers remains remarkably poor. The explosion of new data and the popularization of new analytic techniques seems like a godsend: we will finally know which of our marketing is working and be able to spend our media dollars with laser precision. However, quantity doesn’t always equal quality and this abundance of data is sometimes an illusion. In this presentation, Karin Kricorian will discuss the challenge of navigating between the dangers of over- and under-targeting and methods for doing so effectively.
9:45 –10:15 Psychological Targeting and Tailoring in Advertising
Michal Kosinski, Stanford University
A growing proportion of human activities such as social interactions, entertainment, and gathering information, are now mediated by online social networks. Such activities can be easily recorded, offering an unprecedented opportunity to study and assess psychological traits using actual―rather than self-reported―behavior. In this presentation, Michal Kosinski shows that digital records of behavior, such as Tweets or Facebook Likes can be used to accurately measure a wide range of psychological traits. Such Big Data assessment has a number of advantages: it does not require participants’ active involvement; it can be easily and inexpensively applied to large populations; and it is relatively immune to cheating or misrepresentation. Furthermore, he will show that resulting psychological profiles can be used to optimize the targeting and tailoring of marketing communication. If the ethical challenges can be overcome, psychological assessment based on Big Data has the potential to revolutionize marketing.
10:15 – 10:45 Break
10:45 – 11:15 De-biasing B2B Investment Decisions: From Wide Data to Marketing Impact
Anne-Lise Kopp, EU Marketing Manager, Performance & Insights, Shell
Ivan Vlahinic, Senior Manager, Data Science, Ekimetrics
11:15 – 11:45 Presentation to be Announced
Dean Eckles, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
11:45 – 12:00 p.m. Closing Remarks

Speakers

Gary Class

Senior Vice President, Wells Fargo & Company

View Bio

JP Dube

University of Chicago

Dean Eckles

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

View Bio

Justine Hastings

Brown University

View Bio

Barbara Kahn

University of Pennsylvania and Executive Director, Marketing Science Institute

Anne-Lise Kopp

EU Marketing Manager, Performance & Insights, Shell

Michal Kosinski

Stanford University

View Bio

Karin Kricorian

Director, Management Science and Integration, The Walt Disney Company

Phillip Leslie

Chief Digital Economist & Vice President, Amazon

View Bio

Jim Maurer

Data Scientist, Volkswagen of America, Inc.

View Bio

Sanjog Misra

University of Chicago

View Bio

Sarah Moshary

University of Chicago

View Bio

Harikesh Nair

Stanford University

View Bio

David Reiley

Principal Scientist, Pandora

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Cheryl Cramer Toto

CEO, Marketing Science Institute

Ivan Vlahinic

Senior Manager, Data Science, Ekimetrics

Gary Class

In his work with the Virtual Channels Group management team, Gary Class is responsible for strategic business analysis regarding the digital banking and phone channels. Gary analyzes customer preferences and behaviors to help Wells Fargo respond to customers’ banking needs and to develop new financial services that can be accessed anytime, anywhere.

Key milestones include the bank-wide adoption of Customer-centric probability of attrition & Customer Lifetime Value models. A recent focus is the development & deployment of “CSI360”, a Customer-centric channel interaction big data analytics environment.

Previously, Gary was responsible for Branch & ATM location planning & analysis throughout the Wells Fargo franchise and played a lead role in the development of Wells Fargo’s innovative branch delivery strategy, including the offsite ATM and supermarket banking program.

Gary received his MBA in Finance from the Haas School, University of California, Berkeley and his B.A. cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania.

JP Dube

Dean Eckles

Dean Eckles is a social scientist and statistician. Dean is the KDD Career Development Professor in Communications and Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an associate professor in the MIT Sloan School of Management, and affiliated faculty at the MIT Institute for Data, Systems & Society. He was previously a member of the Core Data Science team at Facebook. Much of his research examines how interactive technologies affect human behavior by mediating, amplifying, and directing social influence — and statistical methods to study these processes. Dean’s empirical work uses large field experiments and observational studies. His research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and other peer-reviewed journals and proceedings in statistics, computer science, and marketing. Dean holds degrees from Stanford University in philosophy (BA), symbolic systems (BS, MS), statistics (MS), and communication (PhD).

Justine Hastings

Justine Hastings is a professor of economics at Brown University and a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, with program affiliations in Public Economics, Education Economics, Aging, Industrial Organization, and Environmental and Energy Economics, and she is an active participant in the Household Finance Working Group. She holds a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics, and has served as a managing editor for the International Journal of Industrial Organization. She serves on the Academic Research Council for the United States Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and on the Council of Economic Advisors to the Governor of Rhode Island.  She has served as an expert economist for state and federal agencies in matters related to antitrust, energy and environmental regulation. 

Barbara Kahn

Anne-Lise Kopp

Michal Kosinski

Michal Kosinski is Associate Professor in Organizational Behavior at Stanford University Graduate School of Business. His research focuses on humans in a digital environment and employs cutting-edge computational methods, AI and Big Data. Michal received his PhD in Psychology from the University of Cambridge (UK) in 2014. Prior to his current appointment, he was as a Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University (Computer Science Department) and a researcher at Microsoft Research.

Karin Kricorian

Phillip Leslie

Phillip is a leading expert on ticket pricing, having published a number of empirical papers that explore venue tiering, season ticket bundling and ticket reselling. A theme throughout this work is how simple pricing strategies can perform very well compared to more sophisticated (and often impractical) alternatives.

Phillip has also written a series of papers on information disclosure as a policy tool. For example, in one study he shows that restaurant hygiene grade cards caused a 20% decrease in the number of people admitted to hospital with food-related illnesses. Another study shows that consumers at Starbucks reduced calorie purchases by 6% due to calorie posting on the menus.

In other research, Phillip has written about managerial incentives in private equity, consumer boycotts and the returns to education. His research is published in the American Economic Journal, American Economic Review, Journal of Labor Economics, Quantitative Marketing and Economics, Quarterly Journal of Economics and the RAND Journal of Economics. Phillip is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Phillip teaches strategic management at Anderson and he is an experienced executive education teacher. He has also participated in business study trips to Australia, China, India, Japan and Russia. Phillip is originally from Australia. He received his Ph. D in Economics from Yale University.

Jim Maurer

Jim Maurer is a Data Scientist for VW Credit/Audi Financial Services (VCI/AFS); the captive finance company for Volkswagen Group of America. In this role Jim helps define how cutting-edge data science and VW’s extensive customer data can be leveraged to deliver more effective marketing, enhance the customer experience, and improve operational efficiencies.

Prior to his role at VCI/AFS Jim spent over 20 years working at the intersection of marketing, technology, and analytics. Prior positions include Catalina Marketing, Allstate Insurance, and Information Resources, Inc. Jim has also worked as a consultant, identifying and developing opportunities to apply data science methods in the non-profit sector.

Jim received his MBA from the Booth School at the University of Chicago in 2000. He also has a Master’s in Economics, with a focus in the areas of Econometrics and Statistics from Northern Illinois University. Jim enjoys spending his free-time traveling, riding motorcycles, and exposing those beliefs seen as absolute truths, but which are in fact simply false.

Sanjog Misra

Sanjog Misra Charles H. Kellstadt Professor of Marketing and the Neubauer Family Fellow at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. His research focuses on the use of machine learning, deep learning and structural econometric methods to study consumer and firm decisions. In particular, his research involves building data-driven models aimed at understanding how consumers make choices and investigating firm decisions pertaining to pricing, targeting and salesforce management issues. More broadly, Sanjog is interested in the development of scalable algorithms, calibrated on large-scale data, and the implementation of such algorithms in real world decision environments.

Sanjog currently serves as Co-Editor of Quantitative Marketing and Economics and as Associate Editor at Management Science and the Journal of Business and Economic Statistics. Professor Misra is actively involved in partnering with firms in his research and has worked on various projects with companies such as Oath, Verizon, Eli Lilly, Adventis, Mercer Consulting, Sprint, MGM, Bausch & Lomb, Xerox Corporation, Ziprecruiter and Lucent Technologies with the aim of helping them design efficient, analytics-based, management systems that result in better decisions. He currently serves as an advisor to several startups in the marketing technology, measurement and AI space. At Booth Sanjog teaches courses on Algorithmic Marketing. These courses bring his practical and research expertise in the algorithmic marketing domain into the classroom. He is hopeful that these classes will get students ready for the next evolution of marketing that he believes is already underway.

Prior to joining Booth, Sanjog was Professor of Marketing at UCLA Anderson School of Management and Professor at the Simon School of Business at the University of Rochester. In addition he has been visiting faculty at the Johnson School of Management at Cornell University and the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University.

Sarah Moshary

Sarah Moshary’s research interests span from industrial organization to political economy, with a focus on how firms adapt to regulation. Her projects include work on the pricing of political advertising on TV, the privatization of liquor sales in Washington state, and price obfuscation in e-commerce.

Sarah earned a PhD in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an AB in economics from Harvard College. Prior to joining Booth, Sarah was an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Economics. Between her studies at MIT and her time at the University of Pennyslvania, she was a postdoctoral scholar at eBay.

Harikesh Nair

Harikesh Nair is the Jonathan B. Lovelace Professor of Marketing at Stanford GSB. His research is in marketing analytics and computational social science. His research brings together social science theory, statistical tools and Marketing data to better understand consumer behavior and to improve the strategic marketing decisions of firms. This work speaks to the challenges and opportunities firms face as they transition to a world where Marketing becomes a data-oriented, algorithmically-driven business function. Nair was previously Chief Business Strategy Scientist at JD.com. In this role, he focused on using marketing science and applied econometrics to drive growth for JD and its partner brands in China, leveraging the large data assets and AI-driven technology platform of JD.

David Reiley

David Reiley is passionate about the use of field experiments in economics and the social sciences, and has spent his career promoting their use. Before his dissertation at MIT in 1996, field experiments were quite rare in economics. Now there are dozens of people regularly performing field experiments to learn about economic and social behavior. Most people still consider economics to be an observational rather than an experimental science, but that has been changing significantly.

David recently began working at Google as a Research Scientist. Before that, he was at Yahoo! Research where he worked primarily on experiments to measure the effects of online advertising. Previously, he was also a professor of economics at the University of Arizona. He has also taught in the department of Economics at Vanderbilt University, and in the department of Management and Strategy at Northwestern University.

In 2010, David settled in Berkeley, California, with his wife Jill Sazama. He is finally feeling a bit settled in the Bay Area, after several years of transition between his former home in Tucson and his new home in California.  I enjoy being able to take the GBus to work (from Berkeley to Mountain View), using onboard WiFi rather than driving.  David also started biking around the Google campus and the Palo Alto area; previously he hadn't used a bike in nearly thirty years.

David's biggest activity outside of work right now is serving as the President of the PGSS Alumni Association. The Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Sciences was one of the best experiences of his life, but the school died in 2009 in state budget cuts. David has been organizing the 2400 alumni of the school from 1982-2008 to try to get the school resurrected. He has been passionate about education for years, and this is the only educational institution he has ever been involved with where all the students wanted to learn and all the teachers wanted to teach. The demise of this school was a terrible loss, so he is pleased to have played a role in bringing it back.  David is very pleased to report that PGSS has returned to Carnegie Mellon University as of summer 2013!

Cheryl Cramer Toto

Ivan Vlahinic

Accommodation

MSI has secured a block of rooms at the Conrad Chicago at a discounted rate of $275 per night for a single or double room. In order to secure a room at the group rate please book online here, or contact the Conrad at (844) 676-2522 and reference the group code “MSI”.

Availability and the discount for rooms can only be guaranteed until Monday, October 14th, so please make sure to book your accommodations early.

Conrad Chicago
101 E. Erie St.
Chicago, IL 60611

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